Spinal Reconstruction

Reconstructive Surgeons Ready to Help Improve Your Life

Complex Spinal Reconstruction is only used to treat the most severe spine problems and should be performed by a highly trained, experienced surgeon.

Spine surgery, or reconstructive spine surgery is only recommended when traditional therapy has failed and minimally invasive surgery will not solve the problem.

Patients who are candidates for reconstructive spine surgery generally suffer from complex spine conditions resulting from scoliosis, spinal deformities, fractures, tumors or severe degenerative disc disorder.

Reconstructive spine surgery should only be performed by the most experienced spine surgeon because of the unique pathology of each case. Compared to minimally invasive surgery, complex spine surgery has much greater variability during the procedure creating a higher risk of complications.

The surgical team at CSI is known for their experience and expertise in complex spine reconstruction surgery. For years, Comprehensive Spine Institute has been accepting referrals from other spine surgeons for this procedure.

Is a Spinal Reconstruction Surgery right for me?

Although only your doctor can tell you if a Spinal Reconstruction Surgery is the right treatment plan for you, you might be a qualifying candidate if:

  • You are experiencing pain from scoliosis, severe degenerative disc disease, spinal deformities, or spinal tumors
  • You suffer from co-occurring disorders such as scoliosis paired with degenerative disc disease
  • You have tried other treatment options like (but not limited to) physical therapy, bracing or even minimally invasive surgery without success
  • Your diagnosis calls for surgery across more than 3 spinal segments
  • You have failed back surgery syndrome from a previous spine surgery and your pain or symptoms are worsening

Recovery Time from Reconstructive Spine Surgery

Although the recovery time will depend on the extent of your surgery and your general health before the procedure, you should expect to need some down time and rest immediately following the surgery.

Reconstructive Spine Surgery is usually done in a hospital rather than a surgery center because some procedures can require a few days stay. Patients generally feel some pain after the surgery and during recovery. The pain will subside and most patients report happiness with the results within just a few short months.

During the Healing Process

  • You will likely wear a supportive brace.
  • You should not lift heavy objects.
  • You will be advised not to drive until cleared by your surgeon.
  • You will be prescribed physical therapy which will start with very slow movements and walking.
  • You might be prescribed medication to ease any pain.

ANTERIOR CERVICAL DISCECTOMY AND FUSION

Minimally Invasive Neck Procedure

ACDF, or Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion is a minimally invasive neck procedure where a degenerative or herniated disc is removed from the neck. After the disc is removed, a graft is used to fuse the two vertebrae above and below the damaged disc.

What does ACDF stand for?

A stands for Anterior – This procedure is done from the front or anterior part of the body. In ACDF surgery, a small, minimally-invasive incision is made in the front of the neck.

C stands for Cervical – The cervical spine consists of the top 7 vertebrae (C1-C7) which is most commonly referred to as the neck.

D stands for Discectomy – A discectomy means to cut out, or remove, the disc. A discectomy can be performed anywhere on the spine.

F stands for Fusion – The final stage of the procedure involves inserting a bone graft to replace the empty spaced caused by the missing disc and fuse the two vertebrae together for stability.

Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Complications

Some of the most common complications following Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion include:

  • Anesthesia risk
  • Intermittent difficulty swallowing, following surgery but this usually resolves over the first few weeks.
  • The nerve to the voice box can be injured during surgery with the nerve being stretched causing the patient to be hoarse for a few days or weeks after surgery. In rare cases if the nerve is actually cut, patients may have residual problems of hoarseness and voice fatigue.
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Infection
  • Nerve damage
  • Problems with the graft- nonunion
  • Recurring pain

Anatomy

A cervical disc, in the neck, absorbs impact and trauma.

Normal wear and tear of a cervical disc can result in disturbance of normal alignment of vertebrae and can result in abnormal bone growth or spurs.

This can cause foraminal cervical stenosis, or the narrowing of nerve root canals in the neck.

Encroachment on the nerve root by mal alignment, herniated discs or spurs may cause pain, numbness or muscle weakness in the hand and/or arm.

What are the benefits of ACDF surgery?

An anterior cervical discectomy and fusion can be both an outpatient or in hospital procedure with a 92-100% success rate in alleviating symptoms.

The post surgery recovery time is 4-6 weeks and the procedure has a low complication risk.

This creates a safer, less invasive procedure with a shorter recovery time.

ACDF Recovery Time

Most ACDF patients are discharged from the hospital the day after surgery, but your physician will determine the best postoperative course for you, depending on your recovery and any other health concerns.

Patients are able to return home when their medical condition is stable and to monitor their activities as the graft heals.

Your physician will discuss your pain medication requirement, wound care instructions, exercises, physical therapy, use of a collar and any activity restrictions, if applicable.

KYPHOPLASTY SURGERY

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Spine Issues

Kyphoplasty is used to treat osteoporotic spinal compression fractures, multiple myeloma, or lymphoma metastatic carcinoma. A minimally invasive procedure used to treat compression fractures due to osteoporosis, tumors or other conditions. Kyphoplasty stabilizes the bone and helps to restore vertebral height lost as a result of the injury.

Patients experiencing painful symptoms or spinal deformities from recent osteoporotic compression fractures are good candidates for kyphoplasty. Ideally the procedure should be completed within 8 weeks of the fracture occurring for the optimum chance of restoring height.

The procedure typically includes the use of a small balloon that is inflated in the vertebral body to create a space within the cancellous bone prior to cement delivery.

Once the space is created, the procedure is similar to a vertebroplasty, but in a Kyphoplasty the bone cement is delivered directly into the newly created space.

Recovery Time from a Kyphoplasty

The patient may be able walk as little as one hour after the procedure and should be able to go home the same day or within 36 hours depending on their general health.

It’s normal to experience some soreness that could last a few days where the needle was put into the spine.

Most patients report noticeably less pain in their back immediately after surgery than before.

Based on a patient’s general health, their doctor will give guidelines for activity, physical therapy, and medications.

LAMINECTOMY SURGERY

Spinal Decompression Surgery

Laminectomy, often referred to as decompression surgery, creates space in the spinal canal and relieves pressure on the spinal cord or nerves.

A laminectomy is surgery to remove the lamina — the back part of the vertebra that covers your spinal canal. Also referred to as a decompression surgery, laminectomy enlarges your spinal canal to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerves.

This pressure can be caused by bony overgrowths within the spinal canal (spinal stenosis) or by a herniated disk. Laminectomy is most commonly performed on the vertebrae in the lower back and in the neck.

A laminectomy is only recommended when more-conservative treatments — such as medication and physical therapy — have failed to relieve symptoms or if the symptoms are severe or worsening.

Is a Laminectomy Right for Me?

Although only your doctor can tell you if a Laminectomy is the right treatment plan for you, you might be a qualifying candidate if:

  • You are experiencing pain from spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, herniated discs, or spinal tumors
  • Your pain is caused by pressure on a nerve root or the spinal cord
  • You have tried other treatment options like (but not limited to) physical therapy, bracing, or spinal injections without success
  • You feel numbness or weakness in your legs
  • You are experiencing difficulty walking, controlling your bladder or bowel movements

Recovery From Laminectomy

70% to 80% of patients who have laminectomies show significant improvement in their function (ability to perform normal daily activities) and a reduction in their pain and discomfort.

The recovery time will depend on the extent of your surgery and your general health resulting in:

Being able to return to light activity (desk work and light housekeeping) within a few days to a few weeks.

Your doctor may not advise a return to full activities involving lifting and bending for two to three months.

You should start light walking and physical therapy exercises as per your doctor’s instructions.

CERVICAL LAMINECTOMY

Relieving Pressure on Your Spinal Cord and Nerves

A cervical laminectomy creates space in the cervical spinal canal and relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerves.

A laminectomy is the removal of a small portion of the bone, the lamina over the nerve root and/or disc material from under the nerve root in order to create more space around the nerve root and cord and remove any offending tissue in these areas.

This can help relieve neck pain and other nerve-related symptoms that have not responded well to conservative therapy.

One advantage is that posterior cervical decompressions do not always require fusion surgery, thus reducing the time necessary to heal.

The procedure is fairly quick with a quick recovery time.

A laminectomy can relieve pressure from a nerve root or the spinal cord resulting in reduction of neck pain, improvement in muscle weakness, restoration of normal gait patterns and resolution of bladder and bowel problems.

Is a Posterior Cervical Laminectomy Right for Me?

Although only your doctor can tell you if a Cervical Laminectomy is the right treatment plan for you, you might be a qualifying candidate if:

  • You are suffering from cervical spinal stenosis causing multilevel spinal cord compression
  • Your pain is caused by disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, bone spurs or a tumor
  • You have tried other treatment options like (but not limited to) physical therapy, bracing, or spinal injections without success

Recovery Time From Cervical Laminectomy

70% to 80% of patients who have laminectomies show significant improvement in their function (ability to perform normal daily activities) and a reduction in their pain and discomfort.

The recovery time will depend on the extent of your surgery and your general health resulting in:

Being able to return to light activity (desk work and light housekeeping) within a few days to a few weeks.

Your doctor may not advise a return to full activities involving lifting and bending for two to three months.

You should start light walking and physical therapy exercises as per your doctor’s instructions.

LATERAL LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

XLIF Treatment for Back Pain

As a minimally invasive procedure, XLIF provides relief to patients who cannot tolerate a larger, open back surgery because of the increased risks that come along with it.

It is also less invasive alternative for patients who have lived with back or leg pain through years of failed treatments, including steroid injections, physical therapy, and pain medication.

In addition to alleviating neural compression, this surgery also immobilizes the fused section of the spine so that pain caused by movement is reduced or eliminated.

It is also beneficial because it may allow for less tissue trauma, less scarring, shorter hospital stays and less postoperative discomfort, resulting in a decreased need for post-operative pain medication.

This procedure is used only in the lumbar spine fusing one or more lumbar vertebra and removing the discs between them. It cannot treat conditions at the lowest level of the spine, L5-S1 or for some people at L4-L5.

If you’re interested in learning more about lateral lumbar interbody fusion, contact our office to schedule a consultation.

Is a Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Right for Me?

Although only your doctor can tell you if a XLIF is the right treatment plan for you, you might be a qualifying candidate if:

  • You are experiencing lower (lumbar) spine pain.
  • Your pain is caused by degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, spondylosis, spine deformity or recurrent lumbar disc herniations.
  • You have suffered through years of failed treatments like (but not limited to) steroid injections, pain medication or physical therapy
  • Are not a good candidate for traditional spine surgery

Lateral Interbody Fusion Procedure

In a lateral lumbar interbody fusion, the surgeon takes a side approach rather than the traditional front or back incision. Using this approach, the surgeon can reach the vertebrae and intervertebral disks without moving the nerves or opening up muscles in the back.

A fusion involves the removal of the disc causing nerve impingement (a discectomy), and then the fusion of the two vertebrae on either side of the disc space with bone grafts and hardware such as a metal, plastic, or bone spacer implanted between the two adjoining vertebrae.

These spacers, or “cages,” usually contain bone graft material which promotes bone healing and facilitates the fusion.

After the cage is inserted, the spine is stabilized using metal screws, plates, and rods.

The XLIF procedure includes the use of advanced nerve monitoring system (EMG) and allows the surgeon to have accurate, reproducible, real-time feedback about nerve.

SPINAL FUSION SURGERY

Surgical Procedure for Back Pain

The goal of spinal fusion is to stop the motion caused by segmental instability and prevent back pain.

In this procedure, the surgeon fills the space left after the disc is removed with a block of bone called a bone graft. This graft may be taken from your pelvis, or it may be obtained from a bone bank. Bone graft from a bone bank is given by organ donors and stored under sterile conditions until it is needed for operations such as spinal fusion. The bone goes through a rigorous testing procedure, similar to a blood transfusion. This is in order to reduce the risk of passing on diseases, such as AIDS or hepatitis, to the recipient.

Placing a bone graft between two or more vertebrae causes the vertebrae to grow together, or fuse. If your back or neck pain is caused by segmental instability, a spinal fusion may also be recommended even if you do not have radiculopathy.

When doing a spinal fusion, the bone graft may simply be wedged in tight between the vertebrae, which holds the graft in place. In recent years, there has been an increase in the use of metal plates, pedicle (ped-i-cul) screws, and rods to try to improve the success of the fusion. Many different types of metal implants are used, and all of them try to hold the vertebrae in position while the fusion heals. Bone heals best when it is held still, without motion between the pieces trying to heal together. The healing of a fusion is no different than healing a fractured bone, such as a broken arm. In particular, the cervical spine is a difficult part of the body to hold still.

Is a Spinal Fusion right for me?

Although only your doctor can tell you if a Spinal Fusion is the right treatment plan for you, you might be a qualifying candidate if:

  • You are experiencing pain from degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, scoliosis, fractures, tumors, or spondylosis
  • You have tried other treatment options like (but not limited to) physical therapy, bracing, or spinal injections without success
  • Your pain is caused by movement or instability in a single (or more if you are a candidate for a multilevel fusion) vertebral segment
  • The natural curvature of your spine is too flat or overly curved and is causing pain that has not responded to non-surgical therapies

INTERVENTIONAL BACK PAIN TREATMENTS

Spine Injections to Relieve Pain

Even if conservative treatments do not provide the relief you need from back pain, there are still some treatment options available before you have to consider surgery. At Comprehensive Spine Institute, we offer numerous interventional treatments that, while not completely noninvasive, are still a much more conservative option than surgery or even minimally invasive surgery.

Our interventional spine treatments include:

  • Epidural Steroid InjectionsThese are steroid injections applied to the areas of pain in the spine. They are commonly used to treat degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, spondylosis, and arthritis.
  • Facet Injections These are injections of numbing and anti-inflammatory agents applied to the facet joints between each vertebra in the spine. They provide long-term relief from spinal axial pain.
  • Spinal Cord Stimulators – A spinal cord stimulator is an FDA-approved device that is implanted just under the skin to deliver low-voltage electrical current to nerves in the spine, interrupting and masking pain signals.
  • Stem Cell Therapy – In stem cell therapy, stem cells are collected from the patient’s own bone marrow and applied to the weakened areas of the spine that need to regrow cartilage.
  • Radiofrequency AblationRadiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive procedure that can provide lasting relief to those suffering from facet joint pain

You can learn more about these treatment options from the links above. The results of these treatments can tell us more about the nature of your back pain and whether or not surgery will one day be necessary. A common method of diagnosing the source of back pain is to use an injection to numb a specific nerve or cluster of nerve and see if that relieves the pain. If it does, we can confirm that this is where the pain is coming from and starting working on a more long-term treatment plan.

NON INVASIVE SPINE CARE

Nonsurgical Back Pain Treatments

If you suffer from back pain, it is important to know that surgery is considered a last-resort treatment. There are many non invasive, conservative treatments that can help you find sufficient relief from pain and prevent the need for surgery.

Conservative care is generally defined as non-surgical treatment options to help manage and relieve spine pain. Treatments range from physical therapy, to medication, to injections. Conservative treatment is generally prescribed before surgical options, with the majority of patients experiencing relief with this type of care. If surgery is recommended, conservative care is often prescribed along the way to help the healing process.

Our noninvasive spine treatments include:

We know that many people prefer to avoid surgery. Our team shares that feeling, and will always help patients explore the least invasive treatment options first. If these fail to yield results, or the patient has a clear need for surgery, only then will we recommend it as a treatment option.

You have the final word in how your care proceeds, so please speak up, ask questions, and voice concerns when you have them. Our experienced and knowledgeable spine specialists will be happy to explain anything you want to know about a condition and treatment options.

Get Started

Request Appointment Online.

Phone Number

(469) 947-7463

Frisco Office

8501 Wade Blvd Suite 1340
Frisco, TX 75034

Sherman Office

600 East Taylor Street Suite 308
Sherman, TX 75090

Monday - Friday

9am - 5pm

Patient Paperwork